Skip to content

9 Clips of Classic Black Lindy Hoppers Who Aren’t Whitey’s

June 24, 2014

non whitey's blackThis is a version with very little text, where a reader can watch the clips without a lot of input. For a geek-out version with more thoughts and information, check out this one.

Recently it has dawned on me how much of our focus (including mine) regarding classic Black Lindy Hoppers goes towards the Savoy Ballroom’s famous performance group, The Whitey’s Lindy Hoppers. And yet there are films of many non-Whitey’s Black dancers from the 1930s and 40s.

So here’s several examples of non-Whitey’s groups to get a broader understanding of what Lindy Hop meant to other Black dancers during the swing era. Watch and enjoy.

All of the following clips are from the Bill Green Collection on YouTube. More on Bill Green coming soon to Swungover.

“Rubberneck” Holmes & Others, Spirit of Youth (1938)

Someone in the comments of the video has reason to believe this group was from Chicago, and Bill Green himself found information that they called themselves the Big Apple Dancers. Guess which one is Rubberneck.
Read more…

9 Clips of Classic Black Lindy Hoppers Who Aren’t Whitey’s (Geek Version)

June 24, 2014

non whitey's blackRecently it has dawned on me how much of our focus (including mine) regarding classic Black Lindy Hoppers comes from the Whitey’s Lindy Hoppers. And yet there are films of many non-Whitey’s Black dancers from the 1930s and 40s.

So let’s take a look at several examples of non-Whitey’s groups to get a broader understanding of what Black Lindy Hop was like during the swing-era, and perhaps pick up some new inspiration along the way.

(Another thing we’ll find is that my historian cred is so much based on Whitey’s Lindy Hoppers that I have almost no information on most of these dancers.)

All of the following clips are from the Bill Green Collection on YouTube. Bill Green has one of the most extensive collections of swing dance in film, and he puts them up in fantastic quality on You Tube. I have an entire post coming up soon about Bill Green and his wonderful YouTube page. For now though, I just wanted to give him props.

“Rubberneck” Holmes & Others, Spirit of Youth (1938)

Someone in the comments of the video has reason to believe this group was from Chicago, and Bill Green himself found information that they called themselves the Big Apple Dancers. (The Big Apple was the big dance craze of the year, hence Whitey’s Lindy Hoppers also calling themselves “Whitey’s Big Apple Dancers” at the time.)
Read more…

Why Frankie.

May 22, 2014

frankie_manning1

Frankie Manning is widely considered to be the greatest Lindy Hopper of all time. But dancers who have only recently started dancing might not understand the complexity of what that means.

Here are a few reasons:

Incredible dancer in his day

Frankie Manning was clearly a great dancer in the original swing era. His role in the climax of Hellzapoppin’ alone shows a combination of skill, flow, power, personality, and humor unrivaled in other dancers. A look at his autobiography shows how creative and productive he was, inventing many moves, aerial steps, and choreographies like the Big Apple.

But also I’d like to point out what an inspiring young man he was in many ways: He forged his own way in a highly competitive dance environment and never stopped creating and striving for excellence. Read more…

A Dance Etiquette Poster

March 22, 2014

Over the years I’ve been honored to have Swungover posts translated into different languages. And now a recent Swing 101 etiquette post has officially inspired a large graphic poster in English and Hebrew.

Holy Lindy Land created these beautiful designs. They were put together by Ilya Grig and designed by Ron Dobrovinsky
English etiquette post

Hebrew ettiquette post

John Wooden & Swing Dancing

March 11, 2014

wooden saturated

As a student of teaching, coaching, and practice method, I often hear the name John Wooden, usually followed by some of his famous sayings.

Wooden (1910-2010) was an UCLA basketball coach who, among many things, won seven NCAA championships in a row. However, such results were merely a reflection of his much greater accomplishment: an incredible understanding of coaching (and, arguably, living). In 2003 he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest honor the government awards a civilian.

He’s a hero and a great inspiration in my practice, and living. Here is a list of some of the Wooden-isms that can easily apply to getting more out of swing dancing.

(A note on the source: This list was sent to me a long time ago, and I have not been able to confirm that all are Wooden-isms. Most of them are, according to Wooden’s website or books.)


“Big things are accomplished only through the perfection of minor details.”

A fancy-pants move will look good only if its rhythm, balance, and traveling distances are precise. Getting an extra six inches in height on that aerial doesn’t take more muscle and strength, but perhaps just focusing on popping the hips at the precise time. A great choreography is honed by focusing and perfecting several counts at a time.

Read more…

Swing 101 — 20 Original Lindy Hoppers Every Beginner Should Know (Or At least See Dance)

February 25, 2014

Chances are most beginner dancers will hear the name Frankie Manning at some point in the first couple of months of their dancing. But how long will they dance before they hear the names Jewel McGowan, Lenny Smith, Jean Veloz, or Leon James? Or, more importantly, see them dance?

In my opinion, the sooner a beginner dancer sees the great dance voices of the past, the sooner they can get excited and draw inspiration from those great voices. (Hence, it’s not all that important that a beginner dancer know all the names — just that they see the amazing but different things Lindy Hop meant to all these great individuals in the dance.)

And that’s what this video is for, which doesn’t even cover all of the 1930s & 40s dancers of note and hardly any of the post WWII generation’s. Hence, it’s just a starting point. But don’t worry, there’s a “20 More…” list coming.

Read more…

History of Caucasian Dancing

February 10, 2014

The great jazz dancers Al Minns & Leon James often worked with the historian Marshall Stearns to educate people on the history of jazz dance.

A few years ago I had the idea to do a similar educational clip about the history of Caucasian social dancing, a topic very few scholars would be interested in. Luckily, my film-making partner Nick Williams and I found some: good friends Javier Johnson and Shani B helped us explore the overlooked history of one culture’s contribution to social dancing.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 848 other followers